PHOENIX -- At some point, Giancarlo Stanton could be moving up in the order. For now, manager Ozzie Guillen is fine with the 22-year-old slugger hitting fifth.

The rationale is connected to Carlos Lee being an established run producer at the cleanup spot. And Jose Reyes has been hot since batting third.

Stanton was batting cleanup prior to the Marlins acquiring Lee from the Astros on July 4. But four days after Lee arrived, Stanton underwent surgery to remove two cartilage chips from his right knee.

Stanton was reinstated from the disabled list on Aug. 7, and he's made eight straight starts.

Guillen is monitoring when to give the slugger some rest. That was an initial reason not to immediately move Stanton back into the four spot.

"Carlos, he knows how to hit with people on base," Guillen said. "I'm not saying Giancarlo does not. But Carlos has the experience. I think right now the lineup functions better with Carlos batting fourth.

"The ideal is Giancarlo hitting third. But I don't want to move Reyes any place else. I want to leave Reyes third."

Reyes could find himself batting either second or third the rest of this season, and perhaps next year, too. Guillen feels Emilio Bonifacio is best suited to lead off.

"I think Boni should be leading off," Guillen said. "I think Reyes has more pop. Reyes can make more things happen hitting second or third."

Turner to make Marlins debut on Wednesday

PHOENIX -- As expected, Jacob Turner will be making his Marlins debut on Wednesday. What remains unclear is how long the 21-year-old will be with the big league club.

Manager Ozzie Guillen confirmed on Monday that Turner will be called up from Triple-A New Orleans, and he is lined up to pitch Game 1 of the doubleheader with the D-backs at Chase Field.

Wade LeBlanc is slated to start the second game on Wednesday.

"We're going to see what happens, and after that, we're going to make a move, to see if [Turner] is staying or going back," Guillen said. "He's going to start. It's not my job to say if he's going to stay or not. That's somebody else's job. I'm pretty sure they'd love him to stay."

Part of the decision could be in Turner's hands. If the right-hander has a strong outing, he likely will earn a second start.

Guillen's preference is for Turner to remain, but the club has to figure out how he would fit into the staff. One possibility is going with a six-man rotation.

"I think we should keep him here to see if we can count on him next year, or exactly what stage he is in," Guillen said. "I don't think they're against him staying. We're trying to figure out how to use him. To keep this kid here not to pitch is not any good. That's why we're having this discussion, and we're putting everything on the table."

The highly touted Turner was acquired from the Tigers on July 23 as part of the Anibal Sanchez/Omar Infante trade.

The 6-foot-5, 210-pounder made three starts for the Tigers, and he was 1-1 with an 8.03 ERA. He was dealt to Miami the day after his final Detroit appearance. On July 22, he threw 5 1/3 innings, giving up three runs in a win over the White Sox.

Since the trade, Turner has been impressive at Triple-A New Orleans, where he was 2-0 with a 1.98 ERA in five starts.

"If he stays, he has to be in the rotation," Guillen said. "That's my opinion."

'The Franchise' ending a week ahead of schedule

PHOENIX -- Through a rough season, the show must go on. For the Marlins, it just won't be going on much longer.

Showtime will air the final episode of "The Franchise" on Wednesday, a week earlier than initially scheduled.

The reality TV series, starring the Miami Marlins, started on July 11, and the plan was to run eight consecutive weeks.

Wednesday will mark the seventh week of the series.

The agreement was eight episodes, and technically, that is being met, because in April, the first series debuted after manager Ozzie Guillen made controversial comments about Cuban leader Fidel Castro.

Guillen said the show wasn't a distraction, and the players shouldn't use it as one for under-performing.

"Those people are good," Guillen said. "They work. They're very professional. They're fun. They've got a hard job. But the way we play, who wants to watch? ... Every time I watched that, I got depressed. The voice of the guy, 'And the Marlins lost again.' This is depressing.

"If any players say it was a distraction, they're full of [garbage]. They weren't hitting for you, pitching for you. Scoring for you. Making a play."

"The Franchise" did bring insights and behind the scenes access. One of the most popular moments was the meeting with reliever Heath Bell and Guillen. Bell had struggled and he expressed to Guillen that he felt no one in the organization had his back.

Bell felt the editing process made it look as if too much of blame on the disappointing season fell on him.

"It wasn't a good experience for me," Bell said. "It was a good experience knowing how television can ruin your life. It was fun. I like some of the guys, the camera guys. They're not bad guys. It's just the guys who were cutting and pasting, they can make it look like one person is the reason we didn't do well, or they can make it look like the team did bad.

"They definitely portrayed me as the only one having a bad year, because you heard it on just about every episode, but not everybody else."