A look at some notable facts and figures from the Milwaukee Brewers' 3-2 victory in 10 innings over the Arizona Diamondbacks in the decisive Game 5 of the National League Division Series at Miller Park on Friday.

• The Brewers, who moved to the NL in 1998, had won just one other playoff series in their history -- the 1982 American League Championship Series against the Angels, which also went a full five games. They improved to 2-2 in decisive games for postseason series.

• The D-backs have now played three winner-take-all games in their history, and all three have been decided on a walk-off hit.

In their 2001 title run, both Tony Womack (NLDS) and Luis Gonzalez (World Series) won a series with a hit in the ninth inning. On Friday, Arizona was on the wrong end of a walk-off single in the 10th by Nyjer Morgan.

• Brewers left fielder Ryan Braun stayed in his MVP form during the first-round of the playoffs. He finished the series with nine hits in 18 at-bats, four RBIs, five runs and five extra-base hits, including a homer.

He was especially productive against D-backs starter Ian Kennedy, too. Including the regular season, Braun went 7-for-12 with three doubles off Arizona's ace. He went 2-for-2 on Friday.

• Arizona's 10 home runs in the NLDS were the most among the eight playoff teams. During the regular season, the D-backs ranked ninth in the Major Leagues, with 172. Milwaukee ranked sixth, with 185, and hit four in the NLDS.

• Morgan's game-winning hit came after he had just two hits in his first 15 at-bats in the series. He finished the NLDS hitting .188, but he had three RBIs, including Milwaukee's most important of the season.

• D-backs rookie first baseman Paul Goldschmidt finished the series with seven hits and a pair of homers despite not playing in Game 1. He hit at a .438 clip, including a 2-for-5 performance in Game 5.

• Before he hit a ninth-inning double, Gerardo Parra's 0-for-17 stretch in the NLDS was the longest run without a hit since Division Series play began in 1995. Boston's Mo Vaughn (1995) and Colorado's Clint Barmes (2009) each went 0-for-14.